Parkinsonsecrets.com and Parkinsonbreakthrough.com blogs are the Official Website for the books:  Parkinson's Treatment: 10 Secrets to a Happier Life and 10 Breakthrough Therapies for Parkinson's Disease.

Dr. Okun is the co-founder of the University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, the National Medical Director for the National Parkinson Foundation, as well as the author of several books including Ask the Expert about Parkinson's Disease, Lessons from the Bedside, 10 Breakthrough Therapies for Parkinson's Disease and Parkinson's Treatment: 10 Secrets to a Happier life due out in 2013.  His secrets book was translated into 20 languages so that it can be made available to Parkinson's disease sufferers around the world.  Dr. Okun has been recently been honored at the White House as a Champion of Change for Parkinson's Disease. Dr. Okun has been published in journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine and people travel from around the world to seek his opinion on best treatment approaches for this disease.

Cancer Drugs for Treating Parkinson's Disease Patients

There was a recent press release from Georgetown University about the possibility of using a cancer drug to treat Parkinson's disease.  On the surface one may ask, why a toxic cancer drug could be used to address the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (or to prevent disease progression).  The answer is simple.  The researchers at Georgetown are aware that a large part of the abnormality in the brain in Parkinson's disease patients is the build-up of abnormal proteins referred to as Lewy bodies.  The idea (that they tested in mice) was to see how effective this particular cancer drug was at stopping protein deposits.  Though successful in mice, this is a long way from humans.  The investigators also did not test the toxicity or clinical response in humans.  We do not know yet if preventing the deposition of these proteins called Lewy bodies will improve the symptoms and improve the lives of Parkinson's disease sufferers.   This is however a cool project, and we will continue to watch the cancer field and see if it informs or pushes along Parkinson's disease drug discovery.

Here is the press release from Georgetown: 

Cancer Drug Prevents Build-up of Toxic Brain Protein

WASHINGTON — Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have used tiny doses of a leukemia drug to halt accumulation of toxic proteins linked to Parkinson’s disease in the brains of mice. This finding provides the basis to plan a clinical trial in humans to study the effects.

They say their study, published online May 10 in Human Molecular Genetics, offers a unique and exciting strategy to treat neurodegenerative diseases that feature abnormal buildup of proteins in Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal dementia, Huntington disease and Lewy body dementia, among others. 

“This drug, in very low doses, turns on the garbage disposal machinery inside neurons to clear toxic proteins from the cell. By clearing intracellular proteins, the drug prevents their accumulation in pathological inclusions called Lewy bodies and/or tangles, and also prevents amyloid secretion into the extracellular space between neurons, so proteins do not form toxic clumps or plaques in the brain,” says the study’s senior investigator, neuroscientist Charbel E-H Moussa, MB, PhD. Moussa heads the laboratory of dementia and Parkinsonism at Georgetown.

When the drug, nilotinib, is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), it forces cancer cells into autophagy — a biological process that leads to death of tumor cells in cancer.

“The doses used to treat CML are high enough that the drug pushes cells to chew up their own internal organelles, causing self-cannibalization and cell death,” Moussa says. “We reasoned that small doses — for these mice, an equivalent to one percent of the dose used in humans — would turn on just enough autophagy in neurons that the cells would clear malfunctioning proteins, and nothing else.”

Moussa, who has long sought a way to force neurons to clean up their garbage, came up with the idea of using cancer drugs that push autophagy in tumors to help diseased brains. “No one has tried anything like this before,” he says.

Moussa, and his two co-authors — graduate student Michaeline Hebron and Irina Lonskaya, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher in Moussa’s lab — searched for cancer drugs that can cross the blood-brain barrier. They discovered two candidates — nilotinib and bosutinib, which is also approved to treat CML. This study discusses experiments with nilotinib, but Moussa says that use of bosutinib is also beneficial.  

The mice used in this study over-express alpha-Synuclein, the protein that builds up in Lewy bodies in Parkinson’s disease and dementia patients and which is found in many other neurodegenerative diseases. The animals were given one milligram of nilotinib every two days. (By contrast, the FDA approved use of up to 1,000 milligrams of nilotinib once a day for CML patients.)

 “We successfully tested this for several diseases models that have an accumulation of intracellular protein,” Moussa says. “It gets rid of alpha synuclein and tau in a number of movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease as well as Lewy body dementia.”

The team also showed that movement and functionality in the treated mice was greatly improved, compared with untreated mice.

In order for such a therapy to be as successful as possible in patients, the agent would need to be used early in neurodegenerative diseases, Moussa hypothesizes. Later use might retard further extracellular plaque formation and accumulation of intracellular proteins in inclusions such as Lewy bodies.

Moussa is planning a phase II clinical trial in participants who have been diagnosed with disorders that feature build-up of alpha Synuclein, including Lewy body dementia, Parkinson’s disease, progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA).

The study was supported by a National Institutes of Health grant (NIA 30378) as well as Georgetown University funding. 

Moussa is listed as an inventor on a provisional patent application to use nilotinib and bosutinib as a therapeutic approach in neurodegenerative diseases.

About Georgetown University Medical Center?
Georgetown University Medical Center is an internationally recognized academic medical center with a three-part mission of research, teaching and patient care (through MedStar Health). GUMC’s mission is carried out with a strong emphasis on public service and a dedication to the Catholic, Jesuit principle of cura personalis -- or "care of the whole person." The Medical Center includes the School of Medicine and the School of Nursing & Health Studies, both nationally ranked; Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, designated as a comprehensive cancer center by the National Cancer Institute; and the Biomedical Graduate Research Organization (BGRO), which accounts for the majority of externally funded research at GUMC including a Clinical Translation and Science Award from the National Institutes of Health. 

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